Studios

Click here for Submission guidelines.

The TEI'10 Studios program is an opportunity for members of the TEI'10 community to share and explore common interests in hands-on activities. The TEI'10 Studios will offer novel hands-on experiences to conference attendees representing a diverse set of techniques, skills and technical knowledge levels. The Studio offerings will range from the exploration of new development toolkits and prototype design techniques to using emerging or traditional materials in creatively applied ways. TEI'10 Studios are designed to bring together individuals who share a passion for exploring the intersections of bits and atoms with their hands and their minds. They will provide a platform that fosters future collaborations and diverse communities of participants. We encourage you to propose Studios that will help give TEI'10 attendees a taste of the future directions of the field in a hands-on fashion. We look forward to reading your Studio proposals!

Studio Chairs

Amon Millner (MIT Media Lab)
Jay Silver (MIT Media Lab)

Studio Descriptions

Studio - Experience Definition through Storyboarding

The "Experience Definition through Storyboarding" studio will offer participants the opportunity to design compelling experiences from a user/audience perspective, using the storyboarding process as the primary ideation tool. Studio organizers will present an overview of their methodology, providing examples of their techniques in action and comparing it to other approaches. They will demonstrate how they use storyboarding in their practice, using the same tools and techniques that the studio participants will use. Following the demonstration, participants will form teams and collaboratively design an experience using the storyboarding process. Lastly, studio organizers will facilitate a group critique session and offer closing thoughts on employing this methodology in one's creative TEI practice.

Requirements: none

Number of participants: 12

For more information please contact: Sal Cilella ( scilella [at] yahoo [dot] com )

More information (PDF)


Studio - Ambient Sites: Making Tangible the Subtle, Ephemeral and Seemingly Silent

Ambient Sites are proximal. At our fingertips, under the soles of our feet, along the edge of a cheek, they are characterized by the permeability of boundaries, the sudden awareness of movement, texture, or sound. Commonplace sensory minutiae remain so in part because we perceive them to be diminutive, fleeting or indistinct - mist upon a window, the raised nap of a towel, momentary contact with a drifting feather. What happens when we amplify and make tangible our perception of the subtle, the ephemeral and the seemingly silent? In this studio we will explore varied modes of attuning to and making tangible Note: aspects of the everyday that are intimate in scale and inconspicuous in presence. We will use the arduino, sensors, piezos, motors and everyday materials to compose and prototype sensory and affective experiences that magnify, amplify and re-scale our perceptions of the sonic, the tactile and the intermittently visible.

Requirements: none

Number of participants: 12

For more information please contact: Diane Willow ( willow [at] umn [dot]edu )

More information (PDF)


Studio - Measuring Biological Signals: Concepts and Practice

Participants will learn the conceptual and practical considerations in measuring biological signals and how to construct simple circuits that measure biological signals to create dynamic new forms of self awareness, personal expression and interpersonal communication. Using a provided breadboard and simple off-the-shelf electronics (no soldering required), participants will learn the concepts and practical skills to simply measure biological signals including (1) galvanic skin response (GSR), (2) heart rate (EKG), and (3) brain activity (EEG) for implementation in wearable devices, art, industrial applications, and more.

Requirements: none

Number of participants: 12

For more information please contact: Sean Montgomery ( unknownbot01 [at] gmail [dot] com )

More information (PDF)


Studio - Fritzing: Advancing electronic prototyping for non-engineers

This studio will give participants a hands-on introduction to Fritzing (http://fritzing.org), a free software tool for advancing electronic prototyping for researchers, practitioners, and teachers of tangible, interactive electronics. Participants will ideally bring one of their hand-wired prototypes (or a concrete concept) and in several steps learn to document it properly, share it with the community, teach it, and easily turn it into a professional printed circuit board. We might be able to produce PCBs on-site, otherwise we will offer to produce and ship them to participants after the workshop.

Requirements: Organizers encourage participants to prepare a breadboarded circuit design in advance (not a requirement, example circuits will be provided)

Number of participants: 12

For more information please contact: Andre Knorig ( andre.knoerig [at] gmail [dot] com )

More information (PDF)


Studio - Making Textile Sensors from Scratch

This workshop will explore the use of low-cost materials and tools to build textile-based interfaces. We will introduce a range methods for handcrafting textile sensors and circuitry. Participants will learn techniques developed by the workshop leaders and will also be encouraged to use our material library to design their own custom sensors. The goal of the workshop is to familiarize participants with available electronic textile materials and introduce them to a variety of sensor and circuitry construction techniques.

Requirements: none

Number of participants: 12

For more information please contact: Hannah Perner-Wilson ( plusea [at] media [dot] mit [dot] edu )

More information (PDF)


Studio - Personalizing your Pixels

In this studio participants will design, build, and control different types of information displays. Participants will learn how various popular display technologies work, how they can build their own displays using simple fabrication techniques, and how to design displays for specific applications. Participants will be encouraged to discuss how novel displays enable novel interactions.

Requirements: none

Number of participants: 12

For more information please contact: John Sarik ( jcs2160 [at] columbia [dot] edu )

More information (PDF)


Studio - BodyHack Workshop

In this studio, participants use their own body as an INPUT device and also as an OUTPUT device, either controlling or controlled by a computer. When they use their body as an INPUT device a muscle sensor is used, and when they use their body as an OUTPUT device, electrical stimulation will be applied to the skin. As participants try several parts of the body such as arms, fingertips, feet or the heart, they can explore their own best way of INPUT and OUTPUT systems. Another experiment in this workshop will be PUBLISH, looking at the sensory data that is directly extracted from a human being to a server on www network. Then we can think about other potentials of this data, as well as the social problems that might arise with a system like this.

Requirements: none

Number of participants: 12

For more information please contact: Daito Manabe ( daito [at] rhizomatiks [dot] com )

More information (PDF)


Studio - Empowering Programmability For Tangibles

Programming microcontrollers for tangible interfaces can be easier and more accessible than it is now, empowering a broader audience to participate. The first part of this studio will introduce participants to Scratch for Arduino, a graphical programming language for controlling the Arduino hardware platform. The participants will form small groups to create projects using the Arduino in combination with a kit of input and output devices, and program their creations' behavior using Scratch for Arduino. In the second part of the studio, participants will have a chance to get under the hood of the Scratch for Arduino language and its underlying blocks engine, modifying it or extending it to work with other tangible kits. We will close with a discussion about participants' experiences using and modifying Scratch for Arduino and the blocks engine, comparing them to other environments and considering possibilities for future work and collaborations.

Requirements: none

Number of participants: 12

For more information please contact: Eric Rosenbaum ( eric_r [at] mit [dot] edu )

More information (PDF)


Studio - TEI 2010 Development Strategies for Tangible Interaction on Horizontal Surfaces

Tangible interactions on horizontal surfaces are increasingly relevant for collaborative applications, embodied interaction, musical performance, and interaction with 3D information. This unique studio opportunity introduces approaches to developing applications on four related platforms: the Reactable: a musical tabletop, and its companion fiducial tracking system reacTIVision, Microsoft Surface: a commercial multi-touch table, MemTable: a large interactive tabletop, and Relief: a responsive 3D surface. The studio will focus on the unique affordances of multi-input and multi-user event handling shared and afforded by each of the four platforms. Participants will work in small groups within some simplified code templates to develop a small applications focused on co-located input by multiple people, combining the use of tangible objects and touch input.

Requirements: organizers encourage people to install the ECLIPSE IDE on laptops they intend to bring to the Studio. Experience with a programming language such as Java, Processing, or OpenFrameworks is helpful, but not required for all.

Number of participants: 24

For more information please contact: Sergi Jorda ( sergi.jorda [at] upf [dot] edu )

More information (PDF)


Studio - Make Cool Things With Microcontrollers!

Anyone can learn how to make cool things with microcontrollers! Even if you've never even sewn a button, you can actually make a fun, intriguing project at this studio. Blink lights, hack your brain, play video games, turn off TVs in public places -- microcontrollers can do it all. This is for all skill and experience levels. Ages 5 to 100. You can even learn to solder! Learn all this and more from Mitch Altman maker/hacker with decades of teaching experience.

Requirements: none

Number of participants: 12

For more information please contact: Mitch Altman ( mitch [at] CornfieldElectronics [dot] com )

More information (PDF)


Studio - Wiimote Hackery

The Nintendo Wii remote and extension controllers are a family of easily available off-the-shelf devices whose hackability is informally supported by online DIY communities. Easy to open and containing joysticks, accelerometers, gyroscopes, Bluetooth and IR cameras, they are excellent tools for the affordable and rapid prototyping of tangible interactive systems. In this studio we hope to build some basic skills to equip participants with the confidence and knowledge to use these devices in their future prototyping efforts.

Requirements: none

Number of participants: 12

For more information please contact: Daniela Rosner ( daniela.rosner [at] gmail [dot] com )

More information (PDF)


Studio - Wireless Wearables

This studio will introduce the communication and construction techniques necessary to create wireless wearable devices. Participants will learn how to communicate using XBee radios, including digital, analog, input and output modes along with an overview of other useful features. Participants will also learn how to translate circuits onto fabric by making flexible, durable, and attractive connections between components using conductive textiles and threads. Finally, participants will create a finished garment or accessory that includes a soft sensor and embedded actuator and is able to transmit & receive data wirelessly with a neighboring wearable device.

Requirements: none

Number of participants: 12

For more information please contact: Kate Hartman ( hartmank [at] gmail [dot] com )

More information (PDF)


Studio - Introduction to CNC Routing for Prototyping and Manufacturing

This Studio will give an introduction to Subtractive Digital Fabrication, using a ShopBot CNC (Computer Numeric Control) Tool, and explore options for fast local manufacturing of precise project pieces large and small. It will involve both theory and hands-on components that will give people involved in building tangible embedded and embodied interfaces an overview of the processes involved in creating prototypes and manufacturing components using these type of tools.

Requirements: organizers encourage participants to prepare a 2-dimensional design (less than 12cm x 12cm) to subractively cut from a material (not a requirement)

Number of participants: 12

For more information please contact: William Young ( wlyoung [at] gmail [dot] com )

More information (PDF)


Short-Studio - Link Me Up - Hypertext Journalism for TEI10

Abstract: As many papers report, journalism changes through the shift from paperbased publishing to web publishing. As designers and researchers we have to confront our selves with this topic as well, because the Internet provides new chances, and of course constraints in generating and transmitting knowledge. The Studio workshop we apply for, will show ways of explaining, reporting and displaying content in a hyper text way. This means we will encourage participants to make interviews and report from conference talks to present them later on our conference blog site and integrating the TEI10 twitter account.

Requirements: none

Number of participants: 8

For more information please contact: christian zoellner ( mail [at] christian-zoellner [dot] com )


Short-Studio - How To Draw Yourself With Text

We describe a studio proposal wherein participants will draw portraits of themselves with text using gestural typesetting software. TextDraw is an application, recently developed at The Banff Centre, which provides multi-linear control over the creation of typographic works through gesture-based interfaces. In this studio, participants will be introduced to the idea of gestural typesetting as a technique that diverges radically from modern practice. Participants will work with and explore the functionality of TextDraw while producing print and screen-based self-portraits drawn using images and text of their choosing. This workshop will also engage participants in a creative session that looks at the future possibilities for new forms of typesetting tools. Furthermore, we propose the introduction of a tangible-multitouch version of TextDraw for the first time during this studio workshop.

Requirements: none

Number of participants: 8

For more information please contact: Travis Kirton ( travis_kirton [at] banffcentre [dot] ca )


Short-Studio - Slow Computing Gifts

Slow Computing: is a transdisciplinary paradigm that celebrates the rich history and evolution of HCI and computational thinking experiences with diverse forms of interactive computing to foster democratic innovation. It appreciates Stonehenge and pyramids’ tangible and embodied interactions as culturally integrated, social, communal, sustainable ubiquitous computing. Advancing Froebel’s and Resnick’s gifts for intrinsically motivated constructionist learning, slow computing gifts: Sundials; Towers of Hanoi puzzles; marble roller-coasters; water-play and Rube-Goldberg machines, enable simple and transparent DIY experiences that foster computational thinking (recursion, sequencing, parallel processing, modularity, timing, abstraction, systems thinking, sustainable computing, natural computing, etc.), discovery, exploration, and creativity. Requiring only existing local materials (water, sticks, balls, pebbles, etc.), these slow computing gifts provides powerful computational experiences that are globally accessible at “zero” cost. The studio will engage participants’ transdisciplinary expertise to invent, create, deploy, and advance slow computing and slow computing gifts.

Requirements: none

Number of participants: 8

For more information please contact: Winslow Burleson ( winslow.burleson [at] asu [dot] edu )


Short-Studio - Exertion Instrument Workshop

This workshop explores design assumptions about technology in music. It suggests a new technique of instrument design which integrates human-powered electrical generators. It is intended to open up for discussion the relationship between contemporary electronic instruments, requiring proximity to a power grid, or a steady supply of batteries, and pre-electronic music culture. To explore these hypotheses, some related works and theory will be briefly introduced. Then, a construction project will be undertaken, in which the group constructs prototypical electronic instruments of exertion to take home.

Requirements: none

Number of participants: 8

For more information please contact: Noah Vawter ( nvawter [at] media [dot] mit [dot] edu )


Short-Studio - Art-Lab-Bio-Studio

In this studio, the concepts of creativity, interface and interaction are reframed and informed by techniques used to grow, and manipulate microorganisms and visualize biological processes. During the studio, participants experiment with techniques commonly used in basic biology labs to create living "drawings" in 100mm, round petri dishes. The studio is designed to provide a context for critical, generative discussion about biologically inspired hardware and software systems and interfaces. Further, it is organized around the premise that when we look to the environment for models, we look through the lens of biology, geology, and other related bioscience disciplines. Thus we must consider the technical and cultural limitations this imposes.

Requirements: none

Number of participants: 8

For more information please contact: Christina Nguyen Hung ( chung [at] clemson [dot] edu )


Short-Studio - Integrating Old Chinese Shadow Play-Piying into Tangible Interaction

Piying is an old Chinese art form and one of the origins of modern movie. In Piying, the shadow of fur made characters with delicate carving could be seen by audience in front of the curtain. The artists behind the curtain control the actions of shadow using sticks fastened to the characters.

The spirit of traditional Piying performance is to express rich stories and emotion through action change controlled by artists. Now, digital form of Piying characters can be made as a way of retaining cultural legacy. The thing is how people could interact with the digital characters instead of just watching screen animations without the traditional improvising change. It is an exploration of ways of preserving the classic culture treasure in a natural and novel way. The studio draws a connection between an old Chinese form and modern day movies and TEI can provide a fun intersection between culture and creation.

Requirements: prototyping experience with the Arduino platform is not required, but strongly encouraged

Number of participants: 8

For more information please contact: Shi Yan ( hzshiyan [at] gmail [dot] com )

TEI, the conference on tangible, embedded, and embodied interaction, is about HCI, design, interactive art, user experience, tools and technologies, with a strong focus on how computing can bridge atoms and bits into cohesive interactive systems.

Sign-up for our low-volume list to get news & updates on TEI'10.

The official hash tag of TEI'10 is #teiconf. Use this in your tweets to share with other TEIers.

Or, follow our Twitter user, TEI10, to see what we have to say about TEI, in 140 chars or less of course ;-)

Hallmark Cards

Crayola

BudgeText

Microsoft Research Cambridge

Oblong Industries

Human Media Lab